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Economic Consequences of Health Status: A Review of the Evidence


  • Hamoudi, A.A.
  • Sachs, J.D.


The correlation between health and economic performance is extremely robust across communities and over time. Many factors exogenous to income play an important role in determining health status, including a number of geographical, environmental, and evolutionary factors. This suggests the existence of simultaneous impacts of health on wealth and wealth on health. Potential health impacts on national economic performance are explored, and some important unanswered questions are identified.

Suggested Citation

  • Hamoudi, A.A. & Sachs, J.D., 2000. "Economic Consequences of Health Status: A Review of the Evidence," Papers 30, Chicago - Graduate School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:chicbu:30

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 1999. "School Inputs and Educational Outcomes in South Africa," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 1047-1084.
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    22. repec:fth:oxesaf:95-9 is not listed on IDEAS
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    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General


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