IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fth/caldav/99-3.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Checking the Brain Drain: Evidence and Implications

Author

Listed:
  • Helliwell, J.F.

Abstract

The main conlusion to be drawen from this paper's review of the brain drain data i sthat the 1990s movements of educated Canadians to the United States are surprisingly small, when viewed relative to past movements of educated Canadians to the United States, current perceptions, and past and current immigration to Canada from other countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Helliwell, J.F., 1999. "Checking the Brain Drain: Evidence and Implications," Papers 99-3, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:caldav:99-3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Calsamiglia, Xavier & Kirman, Alan, 1993. "A Unique Informationally Efficient and Decentralized Mechanism with Fair Outcomes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(5), pages 1147-1172, September.
    2. Walter Garcia-Fontes & Hugo Hopenhayn, 2000. "Entry restrictions and the determination of quality," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 105-127.
    3. Juan P. Nicolini, 1993. "More on the time inconsistency of optimal monetary policy," Economics Working Papers 56, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Finnie, Ross, 2006. "International Mobility: Patterns of Exit and Return of Canadians, 1982 to 2003," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2006288e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. John F. Helliwell, 2001. "Canada: Life beyond the Looking Glass," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 107-124, Winter.
    3. David Zarifa & David Walters, 2008. "Revisiting Canada's Brain Drain: Evidence from the 2000 Cohort of Canadian University Graduates," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(3), pages 305-320, September.
    4. Finnie, Ross, 2006. "Mobilite internationale : donnees sur les taux de sortie et de retour des Canadiens, 1982 a 2003," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2006288f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    5. Richard Bird & Michael Smart, 2001. "Tax Policy and Tax Research in Canada," The State of Economics in Canada: Festschrift in Honour of David Slater,in: Patrick Grady & Andrew Sharpe (ed.), The State of Economics in Canada: Festschrift in Honour of David Slater, pages 59-78 Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    6. P. Giannoccolo, 2003. "Brain Drain and Fiscal Competition. A theoretical model for the Europe," Working Papers 481, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    7. Surendra Gera & Samuel Laryea & Thitima Songsakul, 2005. "International Mobility of Skilled Labour: Analytical and Empirical Issues, and Research Priorities," International Trade 0507004, EconWPA.
    8. Brahim Boudarbat & Marie Connolly, 2013. "Exode des cerveaux : Pourquoi certains diplômés d'études postsecondaires choisissent-ils de travailler aux États-Unis?," CIRANO Project Reports 2013rp-13, CIRANO.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    IMMIGRATION ; EDUCATION ; BRAIN DRAIN;

    JEL classification:

    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:caldav:99-3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.