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Recruitment of Apprentices over the Business Cycles


  • Askildsen, J.E.
  • Nilsen, O.A.


Employment of apprentices seems to follow the business cycle. An interesting question is whether this is based on an investment policy where firms recruit when the labour market indicates skill shortage. Alternatively it may be that the firms are myopic and basically hire apprentices in booming periods since they can get hold of subsidised labour to substitute for skilled workers in short supply. We develop an investment model of training with several types of labour.

Suggested Citation

  • Askildsen, J.E. & Nilsen, O.A., 2000. "Recruitment of Apprentices over the Business Cycles," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 2399, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bereco:2399

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models


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