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Environmental Taxes on Exhaustible Resources

Author

Listed:
  • Amundsen, E.S.
  • Schob, R.

Abstract

Environmental problems are tied to the use of exhaustible resources. A resource tax extracts rents from the resource owning countries, whitout creating significant incentives for consumers to reduce their resource consumption. The placement of the tax burden on resource owners affects the international distribution of wealth. In this paper we show that it is optimal for small countries who do not coordinate their national environmental policies, to impose a time-variant Pigovian tax.

Suggested Citation

  • Amundsen, E.S. & Schob, R., 1999. "Environmental Taxes on Exhaustible Resources," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 192, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bereco:192
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Bergstrom, Theodore C, 1982. "On Capturing Oil Rents with a National Excise Tax," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 194-201, March.
    7. Karp, Larry & Newbery, David M, 1991. "OPEC and the U.S. Oil Import Tariff," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 303-313, March.
    8. Konrad Kai A. & Olsen Trond E. & Schob Ronnie, 1994. "Resource Extraction and the Threat of Possible Expropriation: The Role of Swiss Bank Accounts," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 149-162, March.
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    10. Long, Ngo Van, 1975. "Resource extraction under the uncertainty about possible nationalization," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 42-53, February.
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    12. Ulph, Alistair & Ulph, David, 1994. "The Optimal Time Path of a Carbon Tax," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 857-868, Supplemen.
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    Cited by:

    1. Antoine Belgodere, 2009. "On The Path Of An Oil Pigovian Tax," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(5), pages 632-649, September.
    2. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10640-015-9982-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. DAUBANES Julien & GRIMAUD André, 2006. "On the North-South Effects of Environmental Policy: Rent Transfers, Relocation and Growth," LERNA Working Papers 06.26.219, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    4. Lucas Bretschger & Simone Valente, 2013. "International Resource Tax Policies Beyond Rent Extraction," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 13/185, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    5. Larry Karp & Sauleh Siddiqui & Jon Strand, 2016. "Dynamic Climate Policy with Both Strategic and Non-strategic Agents: Taxes Versus Quantities," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(1), pages 135-158, September.
    6. Eduardo, Ley & Jessica, Boccardo, 2009. "The Taxation of Motor Fuel: International Comparison," MPRA Paper 19461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Belgodere, Antoine, 2007. "Ressource non renouvelable polluante : décentralisation de l'optimum en présence d'un pouvoir de marché
      [Polluting nonrenewable resources: decentralization of the optimum in the presence of market
      ," MPRA Paper 28278, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Julien Daubanes & André Grimaud, 2010. "Taxation of a Polluting Non-renewable Resource in the Heterogeneous World," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 47(4), pages 567-588, December.
    9. Poul Schou, 2000. "Polluting Non-Renewable Resources and Growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 16(2), pages 211-227, June.
    10. Daniel Nachtigall, 2016. "Climate policy under firm relocation: The implications of phasing out free allowances," Working Papers 2016007, Berlin Doctoral Program in Economics and Management Science (BDPEMS).
    11. Ganelli, Giovanni & Tervala, Juha, 2011. "International transmission of environmental policy: A New Keynesian perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, pages 2070-2082.
    12. Nachtigall, Daniel, 2017. "Prices versus quantities: The impact of fracking on the choice of climate policy instruments in the presence of OPEC," Discussion Papers 2017/6, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    13. L. Lambertini, 2014. "On the Interplay between Resource Extraction and Polluting Emissions in Oligopoly," Working Papers wp976, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    14. Strand, Jon, 2010. "Taxes and caps as climate policy instruments with domestic and imported fuels," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5171, The World Bank.
    15. Julien Daubanes & Ruxanda Berlinschi, 2009. "Prendre d'une main et donner de l'autre : taxation des produits pétroliers et aide internationale," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, pages 21-37.
    16. Daniel Nachtigall, 2017. "Prices versus Quantities: The Impact of Fracking on the Choice of Climate Policy Instruments in the Presence of OPEC," Working Papers 2017001, Berlin Doctoral Program in Economics and Management Science (BDPEMS).
    17. Ronnie Schöb, 2003. "The Double Dividend Hypothesis of Environmental Taxes: A Survey," CESifo Working Paper Series 946, CESifo Group Munich.
    18. Max Franks & Ottmar Edenhofer & Kai Lessmann, 2017. "Why Finance Ministers Favor Carbon Taxes, Even If They Do Not Take Climate Change into Account," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 68(3), pages 445-472, November.
    19. Nachtigall, Daniel, 2016. "Climate policy under firm relocation: The implications of phasing out free allowances," Discussion Papers 2016/25, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    20. Lucas Bretschger & Simone Valente, 2016. "Productivity Gaps and Tax Policies Under Asymmetric Trade," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 16/239, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ENVIRONMENT ; TAXATION ; RENT;

    JEL classification:

    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)

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