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Education Supply and Growth: the Role of Progressive Taxation

Author

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  • Barthelemy, V.

Abstract

This paper studies the theoretical effects of public policies on growth by stressing the major incidence of both the tax structure and the public education supply. Given an education supply, an increase in the progressivity of income taxation shortens the educational effort since the benefits to education are reduced relatively to its cost. But an increase in the proportion of teachers shortens the educational effort if the adults bear an higher tax rate than the young. For sufficiently high degrees of tax progressivity, an overdevelopment of the education supply is thus harmful for long-run growth. This means there exists a proportion of teachers that maximizes growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Barthelemy, V., 2000. "Education Supply and Growth: the Role of Progressive Taxation," G.R.E.Q.A.M. 00a17, Universite Aix-Marseille III.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:aixmeq:00a17
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eric Jondeau, 1992. "La soutenabilité de la politique budgétaire," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 104(3), pages 1-17.
    2. MARCHAND, M. & MICHEL, Ph. & PESTIEAU, P., 1990. "Optimal intergenerational transfers in a growth model with fertility and productivity changes," CORE Discussion Papers 1990059, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    3. Bertrand Crettez & Philippe Michel & Bertrand Wigniolle, 2002. "Debt Neutrality and the Infinite-Lived Representative Consumer," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 4(4), pages 499-521, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    EDUCATION ; TAX SYSTEMS ; HUMAN CAPITAL;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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