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Agricultural growth linkages in Zimbabwe: income and equity effects

Author

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  • Bautista, Romeo M.
  • Thomas, Marcelle.

Abstract

The comparative effects on GDP and household incomes associated with various pathways of agricultural growth in Zimbabwe are investigated, based on SAM (social accounting matrix) multiplier analysis. Among the five growth paths considered, the "smallholder road to agricultural development" yields the largest increase in national income. It benefits smallholder households the most, but the income gains to the two other low-income household groups are lower compared to those arising from the four other agricultural growth paths. Foodcrop production, in which smallholders have a dominant share, shows a larger GDP multiplier than both the traditional (tobacco and cotton) and nontraditional (horticulture)export crop sectors, which are dominated by large-scale commercial farms.

Suggested Citation

  • Bautista, Romeo M. & Thomas, Marcelle., 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Zimbabwe: income and equity effects," TMD discussion papers 31, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:31
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/tmdp31.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Golan, Amos & Judge, George G. & Miller, Douglas, 1996. "Maximum Entropy Econometrics," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1488, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
    3. Anonymous, 1992. "The Determinants of Household Income and Consumption in Rural Nampula Province: Implications for Food Security and Agricultural Policy Reform," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55994, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Golan, Amos & Judge, George & Robinson, Sherman, 1994. "Recovering Information from Incomplete or Partial Multisectoral Economic Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(3), pages 541-549, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Poulton, Colin & Davies, Rob & Matshe, Innocent & Urey, Ian, 2002. "A Review Of Zimbabwes Agricultural Economic Policies: 1980 2000," ADU Working Papers 10922, Imperial College at Wye, Department of Agricultural Sciences.
    2. Gillson, I & Poulton, Colin & Balcombe, Kelvin & Page, S, 2004. "Understanding the impact of Cotton Subsidies on developing countries," MPRA Paper 15373, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kostas Stamoulis & Alberto Zezza, 2003. "A Conceptual Framework for National Agricultural, Rural Development, and Food Security Strategies and Policies," Working Papers 03-17, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    4. Asep Suryahadi & Daniel Suryadarma & Sudarno Sumarto & Jack Molyneaux, 2006. "Agricultural Demand Linkages and Growth Multiplier in Rural Indonesia," Development Economics Working Papers 22551, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.

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