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Case study supermarkets and quality and safety standards for produce in Latin America


  • Berdegué, Julio A.
  • Balsovich, Fernando
  • Flores, Luis
  • Mainville, Denise
  • Reardon, Thomas Anthony


"Food safety standards that developed countries impose on developing-country exports have sometimes created a barrier to market access. But in Latin America today, the standards set by supermarkets in the region affect local producers far more than do those imposed by developed countries. Latin American farmers sell 2.5 times more to supermarkets within their own countries than they export to the rest of the world. Drawing on case studies from several Latin American countries, this brief focuses on how supermarkets in the region have gone about imposing quality and safety standards on producers of fresh fruits and vegetables for the domestic market." from Text

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  • Berdegué, Julio A. & Balsovich, Fernando & Flores, Luis & Mainville, Denise & Reardon, Thomas Anthony, 2003. "Case study supermarkets and quality and safety standards for produce in Latin America," 2020 vision briefs 10 No. 12, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:2020br:1012

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Asfaw, Abay, 2007. "Supermarket purchases and the dietary patterns of households in Guatemala:," IFPRI discussion papers 696, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    Food safety ; food security ; Public health ;


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