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Rational expectations modeling with seasonally adjusted data

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  • Christopher A. Sims

Abstract

In a world where time series show clear seasonal fluctuations, rational agents will take account of those fluctuations in planning their own behavior. Using seasonally adjusted data to model behavior of such agents throws away information and introduces possibly severe bias. Nonetheless it may be true fairly often that rational expectations modeling with seasonally adjusted data, treating the adjusted data as if it were actual data, gives approximately correct results; and naive extensions of standard modeling techniques to seasonally unadjusted data may give worse results than naive use of adjusted data. This paper justifies these claims with examples and detailed arguments.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher A. Sims, 1990. "Rational expectations modeling with seasonally adjusted data," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 35, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmem:35
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    Cited by:

    1. Rae, David, 1996. "NBNZ-DEMONZ: A dynamic equilibrium model of New Zealand," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 91-165, January.
    2. Daniel Belingher, 2015. "A Short-Run Relationship Between 1-Year Bonds Yield And The Domestic Consumption In Romania," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 2, pages 28-36, April.
    3. Ghysels, E., 1992. "Charistmas, Spring and the Dawning of Economic Recovery," Cahiers de recherche 9215, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    4. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Todd, Richard M., 2002. "The conventional treatment of seasonality in business cycle analysis: does it create distortions?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 335-364, March.
    5. Raimundo Soto, 2002. "Ajuste Estacional e Integración en Variables Macroeconómicas," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 39(116), pages 135-155.
    6. Abeysinghe, Tilak, 1998. "Forecasting Singapore's quarterly GDP with monthly external trade," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 505-513, December.
    7. A. Shorrocks & T. Hens & H. Gottinger & S. Reichelstein & B. Kuon & M. Frenkel & R. Braun & R. Noll & Y. Xu, 1997. "Book Reviews," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 66(3), pages 308-328, October.
    8. Braun, R Anton & Evans, Charles L, 1998. "Seasonal Solow Residuals and Christmas: A Case for Labor Hoarding and Increasing Returns," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 30(3), pages 306-330, August.
    9. Norrbin, Stefan C. & Reffett, Kevin L., 1995. "Trade credit in a monetary economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 413-430, June.
    10. Ghysels, Eric & Santa-Clara, Pedro & Valkanov, Rossen, 2006. "Predicting volatility: getting the most out of return data sampled at different frequencies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1-2), pages 59-95.
    11. Park, JaeHyun & Hong, TaeHoon, 2013. "Analysis of South Korea’s economic growth, carbon dioxide emission, and energy consumption using the Markov switching model," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 543-551.
    12. Otrok, Christopher & Ravikumar, B. & Whiteman, Charles H., 2007. "A generalized volatility bound for dynamic economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(8), pages 2269-2290, November.
    13. Juan-Ángel Jiménez-Martín & Rafael Flores de Frutos, 2004. "Seasonal Fluctuations and Dynamic Equilibrium Models of Exchange Rate," Documentos de Trabajo del ICAE 0413, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Instituto Complutense de Análisis Económico.
    14. Zhongjun Qu & Denis Tkachenko, 2011. "Frequency Domain Analysis of Medium Scale DSGE Models with Application to Smets and Wouters (2007)," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2011-060, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    15. Norrbin, Stefan C. & Reffett, Kevin L., 1996. "A substitution test of long-run money demand," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 253-270.
    16. Lars Peter Hansen & James J. Heckman, 1996. "The Empirical Foundations of Calibration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 87-104, Winter.
    17. Zhongjun Qu, 2015. "A Composite Likelihood Framework for Analyzing Singular DSGE Models," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series wp2015-002, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    18. Saijo, Hikaru, 2013. "Estimating DSGE models using seasonally adjusted and unadjusted data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 173(1), pages 22-35.
    19. Berkowitz, Jeremy, 2001. "Generalized spectral estimation of the consumption-based asset pricing model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 269-288, September.
    20. Lars Peter Hansen & Thomas J. Sargent, 2001. "Acknowledging Misspecification in Macroeconomic Theory," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(3), pages 519-535, July.
    21. Ghysels, Éric, 1994. "L’analyse économétrique et la saisonnalité," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 70(1), pages 43-62, mars.
    22. Olalla, Myriam García & Gómez, Alejandro Ruiz, 2011. "Robust control and central banking behaviour," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1265-1278, May.

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