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Does financial market development stimulate savings? Evidence from emerging market stock markets


  • Catherine Bonser-Neal
  • Kathryn L. Dewenter


This paper examines the empirical relation between financial market development, as measured by the stock market, and gross private savings rates in 16 emerging markets over 1982-1993. With data from all 16 countries, there is evidence of a significant positive relation between savings and stock market size and liquidity. When countries with outlying values for the stock market measures are excluded, however, all significance disappears. The results suggest that we should not assume that a growing or deepening stock market will necessarily be associated with higher savings rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Bonser-Neal & Kathryn L. Dewenter, 1996. "Does financial market development stimulate savings? Evidence from emerging market stock markets," Research Working Paper 96-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkrw:96-09

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bandiera, Oriana & Caprio, Gerard & Honohan, Patrick & Schiantarelli, Fabio, 1999. "Does financial reform increase or reduce savings ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2062, The World Bank.
    2. Oriana Bandiera & Gerard Caprio & Patrick Honohan & Fabio Schiantarelli, 2000. "Does Financial Reform Raise or Reduce Saving?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(2), pages 239-263, May.
    3. Ross Levine, 1997. "Napoleon, Bourses, and Growth in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6093, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-558, June.
    5. Ross Levine, 1997. "Napoleón, bolsas y crecimiento en América Latina," Research Department Publications 4107, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.


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