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The U.K. sector of the Federal Reserve's multicountry model : the effects of monetary and fiscal policies


  • Hali J. Edison


The purpose of this paper is to describe and to analyze in some detail the U.K. sector of the Federal Reserve's Multicountry Model (MCM). The analysis focuses on the effects of shifts in U.K. monetary and fiscal policies at three levels: 1) within the unlinked U.K. sector, 2) within the linked MCM framework, and 3) within the linked MCM under the assumption that U.K. policy shifts are coordinated with those in other countries. In comparing the unlinked MCM U.K. sector with other U.K. models such as the LBS and National Institute it is found that all the models have similar government expenditure multipliers but the components of GNP respond quite differently. The contrast between linked and unlinked simulation illustrates the importance of international feedback effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Hali J. Edison, 1985. "The U.K. sector of the Federal Reserve's multicountry model : the effects of monetary and fiscal policies," International Finance Discussion Papers 267, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:267

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Howard, David H., 1982. "The British banking system's demand for cash reserves," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 21-41.
    2. Richard Berner & Peter K. Clark & Howard Howe & Sung Y. Kwack & Guy V. G. Stevens, 1976. "Modeling the international influences on the U.S. economy: a multi- country approach," International Finance Discussion Papers 93, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Bladen-Hovell, Robin & Green, Christopher & Savage, David, 1982. "The Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy in Two Large-Scale Models of the UK Economy," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 44(1), pages 15-29, February.
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