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Are Basel's Capital Surcharges for Global Systemically Important Banks Too Small?

Author

Listed:
  • Wayne Passmore
  • Alexander H. von Hafften

Abstract

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS, the Basel Committee, or Basel) has developed a methodology for identifying global systemically important banks (G-SIBs) and standards for requiring G-SIBs to hold more common equity.

Suggested Citation

  • Wayne Passmore & Alexander H. von Hafften, 2017. "Are Basel's Capital Surcharges for Global Systemically Important Banks Too Small?," FEDS Notes 2017-02-27-1, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfn:2017-02-27-1
    DOI: 10.17016/2380-7172.1859
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    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/notes/feds-notes/2017/are-basels-capital-surcharges-for-global-systemically-important-banks-too-small-20170223.html
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeremy Bulow & Paul Klemperer, 2013. "Market-Based Bank Capital Regulation," Economics Papers 2013-W12, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    2. Billio, Monica & Getmansky, Mila & Lo, Andrew W. & Pelizzon, Loriana, 2012. "Econometric measures of connectedness and systemic risk in the finance and insurance sectors," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 535-559.
    3. Vasco Carvalho & Xavier Gabaix, 2013. "The Great Diversification and Its Undoing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1697-1727, August.
    4. Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Huizinga, Harry, 2010. "Bank activity and funding strategies: The impact on risk and returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(3), pages 626-650, December.
    5. Dewally, Michaël & Shao, Yingying, 2014. "Liquidity crisis, relationship lending and corporate finance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 223-239.
    6. Beck, Thorsten & Brown, Martin, 2015. "Foreign bank ownership and household credit," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 466-486.
    7. repec:hrv:faseco:34651705 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
    9. Xin Huang & Hao Zhou & Haibin Zhu, 2012. "Systemic Risk Contributions," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 42(1), pages 55-83, October.
    10. Kaushik Bhattacharya, 2003. "How good is the BankScope database? A cross-validation exercise with correction factors for market concentration measures," BIS Working Papers 133, Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Xavier Gabaix, 1999. "Zipf's Law for Cities: An Explanation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 739-767.
    12. Xavier Gabaix, 2016. "Power Laws in Economics: An Introduction," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 185-206, Winter.
    13. Douglas W. Diamond, 1991. "Debt Maturity Structure and Liquidity Risk," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(3), pages 709-737.
    14. Ivashina, Victoria & Scharfstein, David, 2010. "Bank lending during the financial crisis of 2008," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(3), pages 319-338, September.
    15. Bert Loudis & Meraj Allahrakha, 2016. "Systemic Importance Data Shed Light on Global Banking Risks," Briefs 16-03, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.
    16. Mathias Drehmann & Claudio Borio & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2011. "Anchoring Countercyclical Capital Buffers: The role of Credit Aggregates," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(4), pages 189-240, December.
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Size is Overrated
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2018-03-26 12:06:49
    2. Size is Overrated
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2018-03-26 12:06:49

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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