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Public policy in support of small business: the American experience


  • Ben R. Craig
  • William E. Jackson
  • James B. Thompson


Information problems in small enterprise credit markets can result in a market equilibrium characterized by credit rationing. These information problems are potentially more severe during sharp economic downturns such as the recent Great Recession. Government interventions to alleviate credit constraints on small firms need to be designed to correct the specific market failure resulting in socially suboptimal credit flows. We argue that Small Business Administration loan guarantees are a potentially appropriate intervention and provide a review of empirical research that supports our contention.

Suggested Citation

  • Ben R. Craig & William E. Jackson & James B. Thompson, 2011. "Public policy in support of small business: the American experience," Working Paper 1116, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwp:1116

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Degryse, Hans & Van Cayseele, Patrick, 2000. "Relationship Lending within a Bank-Based System: Evidence from European Small Business Data," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 90-109, January.
    2. Kenneth P. Brevoort & Timothy H. Hannan, 2004. "Commercial lending and distance: evidence from Community Reinvestment Act data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-24, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. DeYoung, Robert & Glennon, Dennis & Nigro, Peter, 2008. "Borrower-lender distance, credit scoring, and loan performance: Evidence from informational-opaque small business borrowers," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 113-143, January.
    4. Rose, Morgan J., 2008. "Predatory lending practices and subprime foreclosures: Distinguishing impacts by loan category," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 13-32.
    5. Robert Hauswald & Robert Marquez, 2006. "Competition and Strategic Information Acquisition in Credit Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(3), pages 967-1000.
    6. Kau, James B, et al, 1992. "A Generalized Valuation Model for Fixed-Rate Residential Mortgages," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 24(3), pages 279-299, August.
    7. Kau James B. & Keenan Donald C. & Kim Taewon, 1994. "Default Probabilities for Mortgages," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 278-296, May.
    8. Ozgur Emre Ergungor, 2010. "Bank Branch Presence and Access to Credit in Low- to Moderate-Income Neighborhoods," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(7), pages 1321-1349, October.
    9. Sumit Agarwal & Souphala Chomsisengphet & Chunlin Liu & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2010. "Benefits of relationship banking: evidence from consumer credit markets," Working Paper Series WP-2010-05, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    10. Danis, Michelle A. & Pennington-Cross, Anthony, 2008. "The delinquency of subprime mortgages," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 67-90.
    11. Stephanie Moulton, 2010. "Originating lender localness and mortgage sustainability: an evaluation of delinquency and foreclosure in Indiana's mortgage revenue bond program," Housing Policy Debate, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(4), pages 581-617, September.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Should small businesses be encouraged?
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-09-29 19:17:00

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    Small business - Finance ; Small Business Administration ; Financial markets;

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