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A importância da análise de solos e plantas na produção agrícola


  • António C. Pinheiro

    () (Universidade de Évora,Departamento de Economia)

  • Maria de Lourdes Pimenta da Silva Pinheiro

    () (Universidade de Évora, Laboratório Quimico-Agrícola)


Este trabalho começa por realçar a importância da análise químicas de solos e plantas na agricultura, quer contribuindo para a minimização dos custos privados (custos de produção do empresário), quer na redução dos custos sociais (redução das externalidades negativas que originam a poluição das águas e do ambiente) causadas pelo excesso de fertilizantes. Demonstra-se que não é possível praticar agricultura moderna, agricultura de precisão, sem recorrer à análise de solos e plantas. Seguidamente aborda-se a contribuição do Laboratório Químico Agrícola (LQA) da Universidade de Évora nos diferentes tipos de análise de solos e plantas. Finalmente, tendo presente a agricultura da região Alentejo, fazem-se estimativas sobre o que se prevê venham a ser as necessidades de análises para uma agricultura que se quer moderna e sustentável dos pontos de vista económico, social e ambiental. Prova-se que é de esperar que os agricultores recorram, cada vez mais ao LQA, levando ao crescimento do número de amostras de solos e plantas que será necessário analisar.

Suggested Citation

  • António C. Pinheiro & Maria de Lourdes Pimenta da Silva Pinheiro, 2011. "A importância da análise de solos e plantas na produção agrícola," Economics Working Papers 3_2011, University of Évora, Department of Economics (Portugal).
  • Handle: RePEc:evo:wpecon:3_2011

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    análise de solos; agricultura de precisão; adubos; fertilizantes; produtividade média; produtividade marginal; externalidades negativas; LQA;

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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