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Finance of Modern Economic Growth - The Historical Role of Agricultural Resources

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  • Ashoka Mody

Abstract

The importance of an 'agricultural surplus' for the structural transformation accompanying economic growth is often stressed in development literature. 'Agricultural surplus', defined as the physical marketed surplus of food and raw materials, has an evident role in the expansion of non-farm employment. [Working Paper No. 121]

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  • Ashoka Mody, 2010. "Finance of Modern Economic Growth - The Historical Role of Agricultural Resources," Working Papers id:3064, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3064 Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    agriculture; surplus; structural; economic; food; raw materials; employment;

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