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The disutility of waiting time: Evidence from the Public Primary HealthCare Service in Andalucía


  • Rafael Serrano-del-Rosal


  • Esperanza Vera-Toscano
  • Victoria Ateca-Amestoy


The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between satisfaction with waiting times in the Public Primary Health Care Service in Andalucía and a host of individual variables as well as market determinants. Since waiting time is imposing an opportunity cost on individuals, we model how agents derive different levels of utility and thus report degrees of satisfaction accounting for differences on opportunity cost components. The empirical research draws upon data from the 2002 Survey for Improving Patient Satisfaction with the Health Care Service in Andalucía. Ordered probit models are used to estimate different indirect utility functions specifications for the whole sample, as well as for men and women sub-samples and different age categories. Results suggest that there is evidence to support the existence of different behaviour within both sex and age groups and that provided health care characteristics also shape utility and satisfaction.

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  • Rafael Serrano-del-Rosal & Esperanza Vera-Toscano & Victoria Ateca-Amestoy, 2004. "The disutility of waiting time: Evidence from the Public Primary HealthCare Service in Andalucía," IESA Working Papers Series 0406, Institute for Social Syudies of Andalusia - Higher Council for Scientific Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:esa:iesawp:0406

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Azzi, Corry & Ehrenberg, Ronald G, 1975. "Household Allocation of Time and Church Attendance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(1), pages 27-56, February.
    6. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Introduction to the Economics of Religion," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1465-1495, September.
    7. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2002. "Religion and Political Economy in an International Panel," Scholarly Articles 3221170, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    8. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Corrigenda [Introduction to the Economics of Religion]," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 1941-1941, December.
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    Disutility/Utility; waiting times; primary health care; socio-economic factors.;

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