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Assembling the fractured European consumer

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  • Marco Dani

Abstract

Recognised and shaped by regulatory strategies pulling in different directions, the European consumer may be portrayed as a fractured subject. By drawing from the Pasta and Hormones litigation, the article investigates its multiple and heterogeneous identities as resulting from the interaction between domestic, EU and WTO law. It argues that the fractured consumer could be viewed as a realistic legal projection of the human condition of actual individuals engaging in consumer activities, and sets out an adjudicative strategy for assembling its identities at an argumentative level so as to do the best by their promises and counter their biases. The article concludes by suggesting that the conceptual framework construed around the fractured consumer could improve the transparency and contestability of adjudication and policy-making.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Dani, 2011. "Assembling the fractured European consumer," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 29, European Institute, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:eiq:eileqs:29
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    File URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/europeanInstitute/LEQS/LEQSPaper29.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Consumer law; legal pluralism; subjectification; interpretive community; Pasta; Hormones.;

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