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The regional employment impacts of renewable energy expenditures: The case for modelling

  • Allan, Grant
  • Gilmartin, Michelle

One aspect of the case for policy support for renewable energy developments is the wider economic benefits that are expected to be generated. Within Scotland, as with other regions of the UK, there is a focus on encouraging domestically‐based renewable technologies. In this paper, we use a regional computable general equilibrium framework to model the impact on the Scottish economy of expenditures relating to marine energy installations. The results illustrate the potential for (considerable) ‘legacy’ effects after expenditures cease. In identifying the specific sectoral expenditures with the largest impact on (lifetime) regional employment, this approach offers important policy guidance.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10943/342
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Paper provided by Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE) in its series SIRE Discussion Papers with number 2011-68.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:edn:sirdps:342
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  1. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173, March.
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  4. Allan, Grant J. & Bryden, Ian & McGregor, Peter G. & Stallard, Tim & Kim Swales, J. & Turner, Karen & Wallace, Robin, 2008. "Concurrent and legacy economic and environmental impacts from establishing a marine energy sector in Scotland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 2734-2753, July.
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  6. Ikeda, Shinsuke & Kang, Myong-Il & Ohtake, Fumio, 2010. "Hyperbolic discounting, the sign effect, and the body mass index," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 268-284, March.
  7. Krugman, Paul, 1980. "Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 950-59, December.
  8. Scott Loveridge, 2004. "A Typology and Assessment of Multi-sector Regional Economic Impact Models," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(3), pages 305-317.
  9. Paul S. Armington, 1969. "A Theory of Demand for Products Distinguished by Place of Production (Une théorie de la demande de produits différenciés d'après leur origine) (Una teoría de la demanda de productos distinguiénd," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 16(1), pages 159-178, March.
  10. Hanley, Nick D. & McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim & Turner, Karen, 2006. "The impact of a stimulus to energy efficiency on the economy and the environment: A regional computable general equilibrium analysis," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 161-171.
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