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How Well Can We Target Resources with “Quick-and-Dirty†Data? : Empirical Results from Cambodia


  • Tomoki Fujii



Poverty reduction is a top priority for international organizations, governments and non-governmental organizations. The aid resources available for poverty reduction are, however, severely constrained in many countries. Minimizing the leakage of aid resources to the non-poor is a key to maximize poverty reduction with the limited amount of resources available. One way to minimize such leakage is to target resources geographically. That is, policymakers can move resources to the poorest part of the country. Geographic targeting can be quite effective when poverty is unevenly distributed across the country, and this proves to be the case in many countries. This paper is structured as follows. In section 2, we summarize the SAE poverty mapping Cambodia. Section 3, discusses the methodology and dataset we used to create an MWBI poverty map in Cambodia. Section 4, we describe the CCDB. In section 5, we compare the SAE poverty map and the MWBI poverty map as well as the CCDB in Cambodia. In section 6, we consider the implications for geographic targeting, and section 7 concludes.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomoki Fujii, 2006. "How Well Can We Target Resources with “Quick-and-Dirty†Data? : Empirical Results from Cambodia," Development Economics Working Papers 22491, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22491

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Frances Stewart & Alex Cobham & Graham Brown, 2007. "Promoting Group Justice: Fiscal Policies in Post-Conflict Countries," Working Papers wp155, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

    More about this item


    poverty; geographical resource; Cambodia; MWBI; poverty map; CCDB; SAE;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General


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