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Population and Economic Development


  • Kelley, Allen C.


Assessing the consequences of population on the pace and process of economic growth is one of the oldest themes in the literature on economics. These assessments have varied enormously over time, spanning the highly pessimistic to the outright optimistic. A systematic review of the major studies in this literature represents a useful way to organize a survey of the consequences of demographic change. Such an approach places the population debates in perspective, and it infuses a healthy dose of caution in appraising current debates. This paper assesses how the "bottom-line" appraisals of the consequences of demographic change on development have changed over time; why they have changed; what the most recent contributions to this literature are; and what major uncertainties in these assessments merit particular attention by future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Kelley, Allen C., 2000. "Population and Economic Development," Working Papers 00-06, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:00-06

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles Engel, 1999. "Accounting for U.S. Real Exchange Rate Changes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 507-538, June.
    2. de Cordoba, Gonzalo Fernandez & Kehoe, Timothy J., 2000. "Capital flows and real exchange rate fluctuations following Spain's entry into the European Community," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 49-78, June.
    3. Froot, Kenneth A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Perspectives on PPP and long-run real exchange rates," Handbook of International Economics,in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 32, pages 1647-1688 Elsevier.
    4. Mendoza, Enrique G., 2000. "On the Benefits of Dollarization when Stabilization Policy Is Not Credible and Financial Markets are Imperfect," Working Papers 00-01, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    5. Burstein, Ariel T. & Neves, Joao C. & Rebelo, Sergio, 2003. "Distribution costs and real exchange rate dynamics during exchange-rate-based stabilizations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1189-1214, September.
    6. Mendoza, Enrique G. & Uribe, Martin, 2000. "Devaluation risk and the business-cycle implications of exchange-rate management," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 239-296, December.
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    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • B2 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • N31 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913

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