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Financial Development, Technological Change in Emerging Countries and Global Imbalances

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  • Kenza Benhima

Abstract

The paper shows that in a general equilibrium model with two countries, characterized by different levels of financial development, and two technologies, one more productive and more financially demanding than the other, the following stylized facts can be replicated: 1) the persistent US current account deficits since the beginning of the 90’s; 2) growth of output per worker in developing countries in relative terms with the US during the same period; 3) relative capital accumulation and 4) TFP growth in these countries, also relative to the US. The more productive technology takes more time to implement and is subject to liquidity shocks, while the less productive one, along with external bond assets, can be used as a hoard to finance those liquidity shocks. As a result, after financial globalization, if the emerging economy is capital scarce and if its financial market is sufficiently incomplete, it experiences an increase in net foreign assets that coincides with a fall in the less productive investment and a rise in the more productive one. Convergence towards the steady state implies then both a better allocation of capital that generates endogenous aggregate TFP gains and a rise in aggregate investment that translates into higher growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenza Benhima, 2008. "Financial Development, Technological Change in Emerging Countries and Global Imbalances," EconomiX Working Papers 2008-26, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
  • Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2008-26
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philippe Aghion & Philippe Askenazy & Nicolas Berman & Gilbert Cette & Laurent Eymard, 2012. "Credit Constraints And The Cyclicality Of R&D Investment: Evidence From France," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(5), pages 1001-1024, October.
    2. Philippe Aghion & George-Marios Angeletos & Abhijit Banerjee & Kalina Manova, 2005. "Volatility and Growth: Credit Constraints and Productivity-Enhancing Investment," NBER Working Papers 11349, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Yuji Horioka & Akiko Terada-Hagiwara, 2014. "Corporate Cash Holding in Asia," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 323-345, December.
    2. Benhima, Kenza, 2013. "Financial integration, capital misallocation and global imbalances," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 324-340.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Growth; Capital flows; Credit constraints; financial globalization; technological change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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