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Reform in Higher Education: Moving Beyond Transition


  • Jeffrey Miller

    () (Department of Economics,University of Delaware)


The educational institutions existing under communism were designed to serve a society very different from the democratic market society of Bulgaria today. Reform was clearly needed in content, organization, approach, didactics and methodology. We argue here that while Bulgaria has advantages in reforming its higher education system, little progress has been made in important areas and this threatens the future viability of economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Miller, 2005. "Reform in Higher Education: Moving Beyond Transition," Working Papers 05-21, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:05-21

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. T. Paul Schultz & Germano Mwabu, 1998. "Labor Unions and the Distribution of Wages and Employment in South Africa," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(4), pages 680-703, July.
    2. Martins, Pedro S. & Pereira, Pedro T., 2004. "Does education reduce wage inequality? Quantile regression evidence from 16 countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 355-371, June.
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    5. Mwabu, Germano & Schultz, T Paul, 1996. "Education Returns across Quantiles of the Wage Function: Alternative Explanations for Returns to Education by Race in South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 335-339, May.
    6. Brown, Charles & Medoff, James, 1989. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1027-1059, October.
    7. Schaffner, Julie Anderson, 1998. "Premiums to employment in larger establishments: evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 81-113, February.
    8. John Pencavel, 1996. "The Legal Framework for Collective Bargaining in Developing Economies," Working Papers 97008, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    9. Kahn, Lawrence M, 1998. "Collective Bargaining and the Interindustry Wage Structure: International Evidence," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(260), pages 507-534, November.
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    More about this item


    Bulgaria; transition; education reform;

    JEL classification:

    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General


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