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Career Interruptions: A Neglected Aspect of a Neoclassical Model

  • Emin Gahramanov

    ()

  • Xueli Tang

There is voluminous literature on the reasons behind career interruptions, ranging from maternity leave and organizational layoffs, to national service and human capital acquisition. We show that a standard, neoclassical model of intertemporal consumption/saving and labor/leisure choices without any friction can generate multiple career interruptions as a natural outcome of a consumption/leisure smoothing exercise performed by perfectly rational agents. Given the complexity of such a model, and to be consistent with traditions from the optimal control branch of mathematics, we use advances in numerical optimal control to solve a neoclassical problem.

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File URL: http://www.deakin.edu.au/buslaw/aef/workingpapers/papers/2014_1.pdf
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Paper provided by Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance in its series Economics Series with number 2014_1.

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Date of creation: 11 Feb 2014
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Handle: RePEc:dkn:econwp:eco_2014_1
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Web page: http://www.deakin.edu.au/buslaw/aef/index.php

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  1. Graversen, Brian Krogh & van Ours, Jan C., 2008. "Activating unemployed workers works; Experimental evidence from Denmark," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 308-310, August.
  2. Loewenstein, George & Thaler, Richard H, 1989. "Intertemporal Choice," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 181-93, Fall.
  3. Boeri, Tito & Burda, Michael C, 1995. "Active Labour Market Policies, Job Matching and the Czech Miracle," CEPR Discussion Papers 1302, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Emin Gahramanov & Xueli Tang, 2013. "Solving for the Retirement Age in a Continuous-time Model with Endogenous Labor Supply," Economics Series 2013_5, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  5. Bullard, James & Feigenbaum, James, 2007. "A leisurely reading of the life-cycle consumption data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(8), pages 2305-2320, November.
  6. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Life Cycle Consumption and Labor Supply: An Explanation of the Relationship Between Income and Consumption Over the Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(1), pages 188-94, March.
  7. Tatsiramos, Konstantinos, 2010. "Job displacement and the transitions to re-employment and early retirement for non-employed older workers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 517-535, May.
  8. Gourinchas, Pierre-Olivier & Parker, Jonathan A, 2000. "Consumption Over the Life-Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 2345, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Ronsen, Marit & Sundstrom, Marianne, 1996. "Maternal Employment in Scandinavia: A Comparison of the After-Birth Employment Activity of Norwegian and Swedish Women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 267-85, August.
  10. Saul Pleeter & John T. Warner, 2001. "The Personal Discount Rate: Evidence from Military Downsizing Programs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 33-53, March.
  11. George-Marios Angeletos, 2001. "The Hyberbolic Consumption Model: Calibration, Simulation, and Empirical Evaluation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 47-68, Summer.
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