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Exemplarische Integration raumrelevanter Indikatoren auf Basis von "Fernerkundungsdaten" in das Sozio-oekonomische Panel (SOEP)

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  • Jan Goebel
  • Gert G. Wagner
  • Michael Wurm

Abstract

This paper demonstrates spatial evaluation methods on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study using geo-coordinates and spatially relevant indicators from remote sensing data. By geocoding the addresses of private households (while not identifying them by name and while guaranteeing their complete anonymity) with block-level geographic precision, respondents' data can now be analyzed in a specific spatial context. Previous regionalanalyses of SOEP on the basis of official regional indicators (e.g., the unemployment rate) were always confronted with very imprecise spatial information. This limitation has now been overcome with the geocoded respondents' information. Within the protected unit of the fieldwork organization responsible for SOEP (TNS Infratest, Munich), the addresses of survey households are used to generate a variable describing the location of the household with block-level precision. At DIW Berlin, this additional variable is fed into a special computer infrastructure with multiple security layers that makes the socio-economic analysis possible. This paper demonstrates the use of geographical location and remote sensing data in checking respondents' subjective assessments of the location of their residence. The analytical potential of linking remote sensing data and survey data is demonstrated and discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Goebel & Gert G. Wagner & Michael Wurm, 2010. "Exemplarische Integration raumrelevanter Indikatoren auf Basis von "Fernerkundungsdaten" in das Sozio-oekonomische Panel (SOEP)," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 267, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp267
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bügelmeyer, Elisabeth & Schaffner, Sandra & Schanne, Norbert & Scholz, Theresa, 2015. "Das DIW-IAB-RWI-Nachbarschaftspanel: Ein Scientific-Use-File mit lokalen Aggregatdaten und dessen Verknüpfung mit dem deutschen Sozio-ökonomischen Panel," RWI Materialien 97, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    remote sensing data ; social sciences; economics; behavioral sciences; multi-disciplinarity; SOEP;

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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