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Subjektive und objektive Lebenslagen von Arbeitslosen

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  • Jürgen Faik
  • Jens Becker

Abstract

Das Diskussionspapier thematisiert die objektive und subjektive Lebenslage von Arbeitslosen in Deutschland im Vergleich zur Gesamtbevölkerung. Die Ergebnisse indizieren eine deutlich schlechtere materielle, d. h. objektive Lebenslage der Arbeitslosen. Dies reflektiert sich in den auf Wohlstandskategorien bezogenen subjektivenIndikatoren, weniger aber in den Bewertungen immaterieller Wohlfahrtskategorien. Hier scheint vor allem der Familienzusammenhang als sozialer Rückhalt von Relevanz zu sein. Gegenüber den aktuellen arbeitsmarktpolitischen Instrumenten - insbesondere gegenüber "Hartz IV" - scheinen in der bundesdeutschen Bevölkerung teilweise deutliche Vorbehalte zu existieren.

Suggested Citation

  • Jürgen Faik & Jens Becker, 2009. "Subjektive und objektive Lebenslagen von Arbeitslosen," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 255, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp255
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.345751.de/diw_sp0255.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Jurgen Faik, 2013. "Cross-sectional and longitudinal equivalence scales for West Germany based on subjective data on life satisfaction," Working Papers 306, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Life-satisfaction; satisfaction in domains of life; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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