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Cohesion policy and inequality dynamics : insights from a heterogeneous agents macroeconomic model

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  • Dawid, Herbert
  • Harting, Philipp
  • Neugart, Michael

Abstract

Regions within the European Union differ substantially not only with respect to per capita GDP, but also with respect to income inequality within the regions. This paper studies the effects of different types of technology-oriented cohesion policies, aiming at the reduction of regional differences, on the convergence of regions and the dynamics of income inequality within regions. In particular, policies are analyzed using a two-region agent-based macroeconomic model – the Eurace@Unibi model – where firms in the lagging region receive subsidies for investment in physical capital. It is demonstrated that the short-, medium- and long-term effects of the policies on per-capita output and between as well as within regional inequality differ substantially depending on how successful the policy is in incentivizing firms to choose best available capital vintages and on how flexible labor markets are in the targeted region.
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  • Dawid, Herbert & Harting, Philipp & Neugart, Michael, 2018. "Cohesion policy and inequality dynamics : insights from a heterogeneous agents macroeconomic model," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 110857, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
  • Handle: RePEc:dar:wpaper:110857
    Note: for complete metadata visit http://tubiblio.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/110857/
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    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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