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Setas – A Vehicle for the Skills Revolution?


  • Renee Grawitzky

    () (Independant Consultant)


Abstract: Sector Education and Training Authorities (Setas), established in terms of the Skills Development Act, 97 of 1998, were launched amid much fanfare and expectation of delivery towards achieving a skills revolution in the country. Upon their immediate establishment in March 2000, these perceived bureaucracies – which controlled the flow of billions – came under attack and became the subject of constant criticism. Over the years, this criticism has not abated and perceptions of Seta non-delivery has been exacerbated by recent reports that a resolution to the ‘skills crisis’ is critical for the success of government’s Accelerated and Shared Growth Strategy for South Africa (Asgisa). The perception of a skills crisis has raised concerns as to whether Setas are responsive enough to the needs of employers (private and public) and the country as a whole. In view of these underlying sentiments, the University of Cape Town’s Development Policy Research Unit (DPRU) commissioned a study to evaluate the role of Setas in contributing towards addressing the country’s skills needs. This study will seek to evaluate Seta performance since their inception by exploring: • Seta functioning and distill, from a range of perceptions (and legislation), their core deliverables and responsibilities; • Whether there are underlying factors – systemic or otherwise – which are impacting on the way in which Setas are supposed to operate; and • Based on the findings of three case studies, recommend interventions to improve Seta performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Renee Grawitzky, 2007. "Setas – A Vehicle for the Skills Revolution?," Working Papers 07125, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
  • Handle: RePEc:ctw:wpaper:07125

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Setas (Sector Education and Training Authorities); Skills development;

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics


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