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Salaire minimum, allocations chômage et efficacité du marché du travail


  • Frédéric GARVEL

    (CERENE, Université du Havre)

  • Isabelle LEBON

    (CERENE, Université du Havre)


En utilisant un modèle d’appariement avec différenciation des qualifications, nous étudions l’effet du salaire minimum sur le fonctionnement du marché du travail. L’introduction d’un salaire minimum semble améliorer l’adéquation des travailleurs aux emplois en rendant les “mauvaises” associations impossibles. Trois résultats principaux sont ainsi établis. Premièrement, le salaire minimum est suffisamment élevé pour contraindre effectivement la formation des salaires, les allocations Chômage perdent tout effet positif sur la productivité et deviennent invariablement inéfficientes (en excluant les situations de sur-emploi). Finalement, des simulations numériques montrent que l’introduction d’un salaire minimum peut-être un meilleur instrument de régulation du marché du travail que l’augmentation des allocations chômage.

Suggested Citation

  • Frédéric GARVEL & Isabelle LEBON, 2008. "Salaire minimum, allocations chômage et efficacité du marché du travail," Discussion Papers (REL - Recherches Economiques de Louvain) 2008013, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvre:2008013

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Frédéric Gavrel & Nathalie Georges & Yannick L’Horty & Isabelle Lebon, 2015. "Inadéquation des qualifications et fracture spatiale," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(1), pages 1-16.

    More about this item


    salaire minimum; allocations chômage; productivité; appariement; emploi; différenciation des qualifications;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings


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