IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cpr/ceprdp/614.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Human Capital, Investment and Migration in an Integrated Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Burda, Michael C
  • Wyplosz, Charles

Abstract

The short- and longer-term regional consequences of migration for European aggregate supply are examined in a simple model in which human capital enters the production function externally. The planner chooses a reallocation of population across East and West that cannot be replicated by the market without taxes or subsidies. The market solution in this model with free migration is always associated with an efficiency loss and might lead to the `Mezzogiorno syndrome' in the East.

Suggested Citation

  • Burda, Michael C & Wyplosz, Charles, 1991. "Human Capital, Investment and Migration in an Integrated Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 614, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:614
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=614
    Download Restriction: CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Horst Siebert, 1993. "Internationale Wanderungsbewegungen - Erklärungsansätze und Gestaltungsfragen," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 129(III), pages 229-255, September.
    2. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2000. "EU Enlargement, Migration, and Lessons from German Unification," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 1(3), pages 299-314, August.
    3. Benabou, R., 1992. "Heterogeneity, Stratification, and Growth," Working papers 93-4, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    4. P. Giannoccolo, 2003. "Fiscal Competition and Brain Drain," Working Papers 462, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. Gilles Saint-Paul, 1997. "Economic Integration, Factor Mobility, and Wage Convergence," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 4(3), pages 291-306, July.
    6. Michael C. Burda & Mark Weder, 2017. "The Economics of German Unification after Twenty-five Years: Lessons for Korea," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2017-009, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    7. Annekatrin Niebuhr & Nadia Granato & Anette Haas & Silke Hamann, 2012. "Does Labour Mobility Reduce Disparities between Regional Labour Markets in Germany?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(7), pages 841-858, September.
    8. Jääskelä, Jarkko, 1997. "Incomplete insurance market and its policy implication within European Monetary Union," Research Discussion Papers 8/1997, Bank of Finland.
    9. Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés & Ketterer, Tobias & Castells-Quintana, David, 2015. "Do we follow the money? The drivers of migration across regions in the EU," REGION, European Regional Science Association, vol. 2, pages 27-45.
    10. Pozzolo, Alberto Franco, 2004. "Endogenous Growth in Open Economies - A Survey of Major Results," Economics & Statistics Discussion Papers esdp04020, University of Molise, Dept. EGSeI.
    11. Istvan Konya, 2001. "Optimal Immigration, Assimilation and Trade," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 507, Boston College Department of Economics.
    12. Arntz, Melanie & Gregory, Terry & Lehmer, Florian, 2011. "Unequal pay or unequal employment? What drives the skill-composition of labor flows in Germany?," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-074, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    13. Jens Suedekum, 2004. "Selective migration, union wage setting and unemployment disparities in West Germany," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 33-48.
    14. Vikhrov Dmytro, 2013. "Welfare Effects of Labor Migration," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp491, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    15. Carlo Devillanova & Walter García-Fontes, 2004. "Migration across Spanish provinces: evidence from the social security records (1978-1992)," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 28(3), pages 461-487, September.
    16. Blien, Uwe & Suedekum, Jens & Wolf, Katja, 2006. "Local employment growth in West Germany: A dynamic panel approach," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 445-458, August.
    17. Faini, Riccardo, 1996. "Increasing returns, migrations and convergence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 121-136, April.
    18. Buch, Tanja & Hamann, Silke & Meier, Henning & Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Peters, Cornelius & Puckelwald, Johannes, 2011. "Analyse der Berücksichtigung eines Wanderungsindikators im Rahmen der Abgrenzung des GRW-Fördergebiets : Gutachten für die Gemeinschaftsaufgabe "Verbesserung der regionalen Wirtschaftsstruktur&qu," IAB-Forschungsbericht 201104, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    19. Alberto Franco Pozzolo, 2004. "Endogenous growth in open economies: a surveys," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 527, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    20. István Kónya, 2007. "Optimal Immigration and Cultural Assimilation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 367-391.
    21. Carlo Devillanova & Walter GarcÌa-Fontes, "undated". "Migration across Spanish Provinces: Evidence fron the Social Scurity Records (1978-1992)," Studies on the Spanish Economy 42, FEDEA.
    22. Pratibha Basrao, 2003. "The Impact of the Construction Sector in the Catching up Process of the Czech Republic and the Role of Labor Migration in that Context," NEURUS papers neurusp7, NEURUS - Network of European and US Regional and Urban Studies.
    23. Nadia Granato & Anette Haas & Silke Hamann & Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2015. "The Impact Of Skill-Specific Migration On Regional Unemployment Disparities In Germany," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 513-539, September.
    24. Roberto Cellini, 2007. "Migration and welfare: a very simple model," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 885-894.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aggregate Supply; Eastern Europe; Investment; Migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:614. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.