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Price Volatility and Futures Margins

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  • Hardouvelis, Gikas A
  • Kim, Dongcheol

Abstract

Futures exchanges raise margins in environments characterized by recent substantial increases in futures price volatility, and they raise margins in contracts that have recently shown the largest volatility increase. Volatility then tends to fall. This reduction is smaller - especially the troublesome jump component of volatility that is derived from a Poisson jump-diffusion process of futures daily returns - when the earlier margin increase is larger. The exchanges appear to raise margins when they perceive the earlier volatility increase to be more permanent. Conversely, exchanges reduce margins after an earlier decrease in volatility, but they seem anxious to reduce margins well before volatility has bottomed out. After the margin reduction, volatility continues to decline and by a greater amount for the cases when the earlier reduction in margins was larger.

Suggested Citation

  • Hardouvelis, Gikas A & Kim, Dongcheol, 1995. "Price Volatility and Futures Margins," CEPR Discussion Papers 1263, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1263
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Kupiec, 1998. "Margin Requirements, Volatility, and Market Integrity: What Have We Learned Since the Crash?," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 13(3), pages 231-255, June.
    2. Dwight R. Sanders & Scott H. Irwin & Robert P. Merrin, 2010. "The Adequacy of Speculation in Agricultural Futures Markets: Too Much of a Good Thing?," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 77-94.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Futures Exchanges; Jump Volatility; Margin Requirements; Metal Futures; Poisson Process;

    JEL classification:

    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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