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Apprenticeship and After: Does it Really Matter?


  • Winkelmann, Rainer


Using data from the German socio-economic panel this paper analyses the labour market entrance of former apprentices, as well as of university and full-time school graduates. There are three main findings. First, the retention rate of apprentices in their training firms is fairly low. Second, the transition to employment involves unemployment periods for many individuals, and two out of three first employment spells end within five years. Third, the main determinant for post-apprenticeship tenure is firm size of the training company. The expected tenure is the same for individuals staying with their training firm and individuals moving jobs. The findings reveal that apprenticeship training is a less secure way to stable employment than is often assumed. Also, they cast doubt on standard human capital explanations of apprenticeship training.

Suggested Citation

  • Winkelmann, Rainer, 1994. "Apprenticeship and After: Does it Really Matter?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1034, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1034

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tamim Bayoumi and Barry Eichengreen., 1994. "The Stability of the Gold Standard and the Evolution of the International Monetary System," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C94-040, University of California at Berkeley.
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    5. Salant, Stephen W & Henderson, Dale W, 1978. "Market Anticipations of Government Policies and the Price of Gold," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(4), pages 627-648, August.
    6. Flandreau, Marc, 1993. "On the inflationary bias of common currencies : The Latin Union puzzle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 501-506, April.
    7. Nugent, Jeffrey B, 1973. "Exchange-Rate Movements and Economic Development in the Late Nineteenth Century," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(5), pages 1110-1135, Sept.-Oct.
    8. Eichengreen, Barry & Simmons, Beth, 1993. "International Economics and Domestic Politics: Notes on the 1920s," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers 233212, University of California-Berkeley, Department of Economics.
    9. Michele Fratianni & Franco Spinelli, 1984. "Italy in the Gold Standard Period, 1861-1914," NBER Chapters,in: A Retrospective on the Classical Gold Standard, 1821-1931, pages 405-454 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Euwals, R.W., 1997. "Empirical studies on individual labour market behaviour," Other publications TiSEM 0ccdaeec-7067-453e-a450-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

    More about this item


    Job Tenure; Labour Market Entrance; Unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers


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