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Taking the bite out of fiscal competition

  • JUSTMAN, Moshe
  • THISSE, Jacques-François
  • VAN YPERSELE, Tanguy

Regions can benefit by offering infrastructure services that are differentiated by quality, thus segmenting the market for industrial location. Regions that compete on infrastructure quality have an incentive to increase the degree of differentiation between them. This places an upper bound on the number of regions successfully able to participate in the location market, and limits the dissipation of regional surplus through Tiebout competition. It indicates a process of fiscal agglomeration, through which regional concentrations arise, which does not depend on the circular causation underlying much of the recent literature on economic geography.

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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers RP with number 1598.

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Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:1598
Note: In : Journal of Urban Economics, 52, 294-315, 2002
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  1. Wildasin, David E., 1988. "Nash equilibria in models of fiscal competition," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 229-240, March.
  2. Taylor, Leon, 1992. "Infrastructural competition among jurisdictions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 241-259, November.
  3. Fujita,Masahisa & Thisse,Jacques-François, 2013. "Economics of Agglomeration," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107001411.
  4. Justman, Moshe & Teubal, Morris, 1995. "Technological infrastructure policy (TIP): Creating capabilities and building markets," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-281, March.
  5. Black, Dan A & Hoyt, William H, 1989. "Bidding for Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1249-56, December.
  6. Justman, Moshe & Thisse, Jacques-Francois & van Ypersele, Tanguy, 2005. "Fiscal competition and regional differentiation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 848-861, November.
  7. Martin, Philippe, 1999. "Public policies, regional inequalities and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 85-105, July.
  8. Moshe Justman & Jacques-Francois Thisse, 2000. "Local Public Funding of Higher Education When Skilled Labor is Imperfectly Mobile," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 247-258, May.
  9. Jan K. Brueckner, 1999. "Welfare Reform and the Race to the Bottom: Theory and Evidence," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 505-525, January.
  10. JUSTMAN, Moshe & THISSE, Jacques-Francois, 1997. "Local public funding of higher education when skilled labor is mobile," CORE Discussion Papers 1997024, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  11. Ian King & R. Preston McAfee & Linda Welling, 1993. "Industrial Blackmail: Dynamic Tax Competition and Public Investment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 26(3), pages 590-608, August.
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