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Prices and returns on paintings: an exercice on how to price the priceless

Author

Listed:
  • CHANEL, O.
  • GERARD-VARET, L. A.
  • GINSBURGH, V.

Abstract

Art is priceless, but paintings, and other objects, have been sold on markets since the time of the Roman Empire. In this paper, we describe a method for constructing a price index for paintings and compare this index to the indices of various financial markets. In particular, we discuss whether the price of art is related to financial markets, whether the art market is weakly efficient, and whether it is more or less risky than financial markets. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Theory (1994) 19, 7–21. doi:10.1007/BF01112011
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Chanel, O. & Gerard-Varet, L. A. & Ginsburgh, V., 1994. "Prices and returns on paintings: an exercice on how to price the priceless," CORE Discussion Papers RP 1106, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:1106
    Note: In : The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Theory, 19, 7-21, 1994
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    Cited by:

    1. Nauro F. Campos & Renata Leite Barbosa, 2009. "Paintings and numbers: an econometric investigation of sales rates, prices, and returns in Latin American art auctions," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(1), pages 28-51, January.
    2. Frey, Bruno S. & Eichenberger, Reiner, 1995. "On the rate of return in the art market: Survey and evaluation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 528-537, April.
    3. Chanel, Olivier, 1995. "Is art market behaviour predictable?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 519-527, April.
    4. Bocart, Fabian Y.R.P. & Hafner, Christian M., 2012. "Econometric analysis of volatile art markets," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 56(11), pages 3091-3104.
    5. Erdal Atukeren & Aylin Seçkin, 2007. "On the valuation of psychic returns to art market investments," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 26(5), pages 1-12.
    6. Patrick Georges & Aylin Seçkin, 2013. "Black notes and white noise: a hedonic approach to auction prices of classical music manuscripts," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(1), pages 33-60, February.
    7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:26:y:2007:i:5:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Charlin, Ventura & Cifuentes, Arturo, 2013. "A new financial metric for the art market," MPRA Paper 50186, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Ileana Miranda Mendoza & François Gardes & Xavier Greffe & Pierre-Charles Pradier, 2014. "Are autographs integrating the global art market? The case of hedonic prices for French autographs (1960-2005)," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 14053, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    10. Andrew Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2006. "A Note on Financial Risk, Return and Asset Pricing in Australian Modern and Contemporary Art," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(1), pages 73-84, March.
    11. repec:eee:finlet:v:21:y:2017:i:c:p:186-189 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Gerard-Varet, Louis-Andre, 1995. "On pricing the priceless: Comments on the economics of the visual art market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 509-518, April.
    13. G. Candela & A. Scorcu, 1997. "A Price Index for Art Market Auctions," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 21(3), pages 175-196, September.
    14. Roman Kraeussl & Christian Wiehenkamp, 2012. "A call on art investments," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 1-23, April.
    15. Andrew C. Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2001. "Art as an Investment: Risk, Return and Comovements in Major Painting Markets," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 093, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    16. Bruno Frey, 1997. "Art Markets and Economics: Introduction," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 21(3), pages 165-173, September.
    17. repec:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:3:p:281-293 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Helen Higgs & Andrew Worthington, 2005. "Financial Returns and Price Determinants in the Australian Art Market, 1973-2003," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(253), pages 113-123, June.
    19. Joonwoo Nahm, 2010. "Price determinants and genre effects in the Korean art market: a partial linear analysis of size effect," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 34(4), pages 281-297, November.
    20. Calin Valsan, 2002. "Canadian versus American Art: What Pays Off and Why," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(3), pages 203-216, August.
    21. Andrew C. Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2003. "Risk, return and portfolio diversification in major painting markets: The application of conventional financial analysis to unconventional investments," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 148, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    22. Patrick Georges & Aylin Seçkin, 2012. "Auction Prices of Classical Music Manuscripts – A Hedonic Approach," Working Papers 1202E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    23. Helen Higgs & John Forster, 2014. "The auction market for artworks and their physical dimensions: Australia—1986 to 2009," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(1), pages 85-104, February.
    24. Candela, Guido & Castellani, Massimiliano & Pattitoni, Pierpaolo, 2013. "Reconsidering psychic return in art investments," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 351-354.

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