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Risk Selection and Matching in Performance-Based Contracting

This paper examines selection and matching incentives of performance-based contracting (PBC) in a model of patient heterogeneity, provider horizontal differentiation and asymmetric information. Treatment effectiveness is affected by the match between a patient's illness severity and a provider's treatment intensity. Before PBC, a provider's revenue is unrelated to treatment effectiveness; therefore, providers supply treatments even if their treatment intensities do not match with the patients' severities. Under PBC, budget allocation is positively related to treatment performance; patient-provider mismatch is reduced because patients are referred more often. Using data from the state of Maine, we show that PBC leads to more referrals and better match between illness severity and treatment intensity. Moreover, we find that PBC has a positive but insignificant effect on dumping. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Calgary in its series Working Papers with number 1999-06.

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Date of creation: 02 Nov 1999
Date of revision: 02 Nov 1999
Handle: RePEc:clg:wpaper:1999-06
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  1. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1996. "Reimbursing Health Plans and Health Providers: Efficiency in Production versus Selection," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 1236-1263, September.
  2. Randall P. Ellis & Thomas G. McGuire, 1994. "Hospital Response to Prospective Payment: Moral Hazard, Selection, and Practice-Style Effects," Papers 0050, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
  3. Norton, Edward C., 1992. "Incentive regulation of nursing homes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 105-128, August.
  4. Ma, Ching-to Albert, 1994. "Health Care Payment Systems: Cost and Quality Incentives," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 93-112, Spring.
  5. Newhouse, Joseph P. & Byrne, Daniel J., 1988. "Did Medicare's Prospective Payment System cause length of stay to fall?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 413-416, December.
  6. Ma, Ching-to Albert & McGuire, Thomas G, 1997. "Optimal Health Insurance and Provider Payment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 685-704, September.
  7. Holmstrom, Bengt R. & Tirole, Jean, 1989. "The theory of the firm," Handbook of Industrial Organization, in: R. Schmalensee & R. Willig (ed.), Handbook of Industrial Organization, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 61-133 Elsevier.
  8. Mingshan Lu, 1999. "Separating the True Effect from Gaming in Incentive-Based Contracts in Health Care," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 383-431, 09.
  9. Allen, Robin & Gertler, Paul J, 1991. "Regulation and the Provision of Quality to Heterogenous Consumers: The Case of Prospective Pricing of Medical Services," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 361-75, December.
  10. Gaynor, Martin & Pauly, Mark V, 1990. "Compensation and Productive Efficiency of Partnerships: Evidence from Medical Group Practice," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(3), pages 544-73, June.
  11. Blomqvist, A., 1997. "Monopolistic Competition and Supply-Side Cost Sharing in the Physician Services Market," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9705, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  12. Ellis, Randall P. & McGuire, Thomas G., 1990. "Optimal payment systems for health services," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 375-396, December.
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