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A selected survey of traditional and evolutionary game theory


  • Ussif Rashid Sumaila
  • Joseph Apaloo


This note reviews the game theoretic literature with the aim of highlighting the similarities and dissimilarities between what we term traditional game theory and evolutionary game theory. The focus is on the contributions of evolutionary game theory to the body of knowledge at the disposal of the game theorist. The note is intended for people with interests in economics and who are familiar with traditional game theory but not necessarily familiar with evolutionary game theory. The main objective is to reach out to the numerous economists and indeed, other social scientists, who are not as yet initiated in the basic theory of of evolutionary games. A major conclusion of this note is that, applications of evolutionary game theory in the analysis of economic problems, especially, in the areas of natural, environmental and development economics are long overdue.

Suggested Citation

  • Ussif Rashid Sumaila & Joseph Apaloo, 2002. "A selected survey of traditional and evolutionary game theory," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:7, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
  • Handle: RePEc:chm:wpaper:wp2002-7

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dean Karlan & Margaret McConnell & Sendhil Mullainathan & Jonathan Zinman, 2016. "Getting to the Top of Mind: How Reminders Increase Saving," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(12), pages 3393-3411, December.
    2. Rahul Mehrotra & Vincent Somville & Lore vandewalle, 2016. "Increasing trust in the bank to enhance savings: Experimental evidence from India," CMI Working Papers 2, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    3. Michael Callen & Suresh De Mel & Craig McIntosh & Christopher Woodruff, 2014. "What are the Headwaters of Formal Savings? Experimental Evidence from Sri Lanka," Working Papers id:6265, eSocialSciences.
    4. Nava Ashraf & Diego Aycinena & Claudia Martínez A. & Dean Yang, 2015. "Savings in Transnational Households: A Field Experiment among Migrants from El Salvador," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(2), pages 332-351, May.
    5. Abhijit Banerjee & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2010. "The Shape of Temptation: Implications for the Economic Lives of the Poor," Working Papers id:2484, eSocialSciences.
    6. Pascaline Dupas, Dean Karlan, Jonathan Robinson and Diego Ubfal, 2016. "Banking the Unbanked: Evidence from Three Countries - Working Paper 440," Working Papers 440, Center for Global Development.
    7. Dupas, Pascaline & Karlan, Dean S. & Robinson, Jonathan & Ubfal, Diego, 2016. "Banking the Unbanked? Evidence from three countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 11420, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Prina, Silvia, 2015. "Banking the poor via savings accounts: Evidence from a field experiment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 16-31.
    9. Pascaline Dupas & Jonathan Robinson, 2013. "Savings Constraints and Microenterprise Development: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 163-192, January.
    10. Pascaline Dupas & Anthony Keats & Jonathan Robinson, 2015. "The Effect of Savings Accounts on Interpersonal Financial Relationships: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Rural Kenya," NBER Working Papers 21339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Espen Villanger, 2003. "Company interests and foreign aid policy: Playing donors out against each other," CMI Working Papers WP 2003:5, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    2. Espen Villanger, 2004. "Company Influence on Foreign Aid Disbursement: Is Conditionality Credible when Donors Have Mixed Motives?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(2), pages 334-351, October.

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