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The Surprise Party: An Analysis of US ODA Flows to Africa

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  • Markus P. Goldstein

    ()

  • Todd J. Moss

Abstract

Conventional wisdom about US foreign policy toward Africa contains two popular assumptions. First, Democrats are widely considered the party most inclined to care about Africa and the most willing to spend resources on assistance to the continent. Second, the end of the Cold War was widely thought to have led to a gradual disengagement of the US from Africa and reduced American attention toward the continent. This paper analyzes OECD data on US foreign assistance flows from 1961-2000 and finds that neither of these assumptions is true.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus P. Goldstein & Todd J. Moss, 2003. "The Surprise Party: An Analysis of US ODA Flows to Africa," Working Papers 30, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    U.S. foreign policy; Africa; democrats; cold war;

    JEL classification:

    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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