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Political parties, two-level Governance and economic growth




Los profesores de la Universidad de Granada, Betty Agnani y Henry Aray Casanova, analizan en este Documento de Trabajo el efecto en el crecimiento económico de las regiones españolas a partir de las diferentes combinaciones de partidos políticos que gobiernan tanto a nivel central como regional. Los investigadores toman como referente datos correspondientes al período 1989-2004 en diferentes comunidades y aplican una serie variables específicas para determinar los posibles efectos que puedan derivarse en función de la titularidad en el gobierno.

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  • Betty Agnani & Henry Arai Casanova, 2009. "Political parties, two-level Governance and economic growth," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2009/01, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  • Handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2009_01

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    GrowthAccounting; PanelData; Federalism; TFP;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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