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Los datos de la Estadística de Empleo del INEM y la estimación de la función de emparejamiento para la economía española



En este trabajo analizamos, en primer lugar, los datos publicados en la Estadística de Empleo del INEM, y las posibilidades y problemas que plantea su utilización en los estudios sobre el mercado de trabajo español basados en el enfoque de flujos. Utilizando estos datos realizamos varias estimaciones de la función de emparejamiento, tras una discusión de la metodología más apropiada. El resultado principal es que el emparejamiento en este ámbito se aproxima al caso especial de trabajadores en cola. Finalmente apuntamos las principales dificultades a la hora de estimar la función de emparejamiento con datos totales de la economía española.

Suggested Citation

  • Pablo Álvarez de Toledo & Fernando Núñez & Carlos Usabiaga, 2004. "Los datos de la Estadística de Empleo del INEM y la estimación de la función de emparejamiento para la economía española," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2004/49, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  • Handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2004_49

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    More about this item


    mercado de trabajo español; Instituto Nacional de Empleo (INEM); flujos; emparejamiento; vacantes; agregación temporal; stock-flow.;

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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