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Critical Factors of Women Entrepreneurship Development in Rural Bangladesh

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  • Faraha Nawaz

    () (Department of Public Administration, Rajshahi University)

Abstract

The paper aims to analyze the critical factors of women entrepreneurship development in rural Bangladesh. The analysis is based on recent theoretical ideas that have been supported by empirical research findings. The paper depicts an analytical framework based on institutional theory, which focuses on three kinds of factors: regulative, normative, and cognitive. Regulative factors refer to different rules and regulations of the Government that facilitate women entrepreneurship development in rural Bangladesh. Normative and cognitive factors include norms, rules, regulation, and values of society. Based on the analysis of these factors, the paper provides many significant policy implications on how to improve women entrepreneurship development in rural Bangladesh.

Suggested Citation

  • Faraha Nawaz, 2009. "Critical Factors of Women Entrepreneurship Development in Rural Bangladesh," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 5, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).
  • Handle: RePEc:bnr:wpaper:5
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    File URL: http://www.bangladeshstudies.org/files/WPS_no5.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chowdhury Abdullah Al-Hossienie, 2011. "Socio-Economic Impact of Women Entrepreneurship in Sylhet City, Bangladesh," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 12, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).
    2. Hayfaa Tlaiss, 2015. "How Islamic Business Ethics Impact Women Entrepreneurs: Insights from Four Arab Middle Eastern Countries," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, pages 859-877.

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    Keywords

    Bangladesh; women; entrepreneuship; development;

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