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Increasing the Timliness of U.S. Annual I-O Accounts


  • Jiemin Guo
  • Mark A. Planting

    (Bureau of Economic Analysis)


The timeliness of the U.S. input-output (I-O) accounts is a major concern for policymakers and industry analysts, as well as academics. In response, the Bureau of Economic Analysis initiated research in 2001 to identify, develop and implement an estimating method for producing more timely and reliable annual I-O accounts than are currently available. The research included reviewing the frameworks and methods currently used by other statistical agencies and academic researchers, obtaining more timely industry source data, and developing enhanced methods and processes for the automated updating and balancing of annual I-O tables. The results of this research indicate that our new automated updating and balancing method can reduce time lag for producing the annual I-O accounts from three years to one year without reducing quality. Our method is based on an adjusted RAS process that simultaneously balances the I-O table in producers’ and purchasers’ prices; uses more exogenous data; and processes tables at the most detailed level.

Suggested Citation

  • Jiemin Guo & Mark A. Planting, 2001. "Increasing the Timliness of U.S. Annual I-O Accounts," BEA Papers 0010, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:bea:papers:0010

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. MartinNeil Baily & Robert Z. Lawrence, 2001. "Do We Have a New E-conomy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 308-312, May.
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    7. No authors listed, 2001. "New Economy," Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft - WuG, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik, vol. 27(1), pages 1-1.
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    9. Barbara M. Fraumeni, 2001. "E-Commerce: Measurement and Measurement Issues," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 318-322, May.
    10. Hausman, Jerry, 1999. "Cellular Telephone, New Products, and the CPI," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(2), pages 188-194, April.
    11. William D. Nordhaus, 2000. "New Data and Output Concepts for Understanding Productivity Trends," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1286, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    12. Richard G. Frank & Ernst R. Berndt & Susan H. Busch, 1998. "Price Indexes for the Treatment of Depression," NBER Working Papers 6417, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General


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