IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bbk/bbkefp/1001.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Unobserved common factors in military expenditure interactions across MENA countries

Author

Listed:
  • Elisa Cavatorta

    (Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics, Birkbeck)

Abstract

In this paper we explore the patterns of interactions between military expenditure shares in the MENA region over the period 1979-2007. We explore if there are latent common factors that impact on the military expenditures of 15 countries in the MENA region and whether these factors can be interpreted. Unobserved common factors induce cross-sectional dependence and may lead traditional panel-time series estimators to be inconsistent. To identify these latent factors we apply the Principal Component Analysis. We evaluate the interpretation of the estimated factors using the Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause model. We found that there is a substantial evidence of cross-sectional dependence in the MENA region, induced mainly by two unobserved factors, but these factors are difficult to interpret.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisa Cavatorta, 2010. "Unobserved common factors in military expenditure interactions across MENA countries," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1001, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkefp:1001
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/ems/research/wp/2010/PDFs/BWPEF1001.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2010
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sen, Amartya, 1998. "Mortality as an Indicator of Economic Success and Failure," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(446), pages 1-25, January.
    2. Trevor Breusch, 2005. "Estimating the Underground Economy using MIMIC Models," Econometrics 0507003, EconWPA, revised 15 Dec 2005.
    3. J Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman & Ron P Smith, 2008. "Determining Military Expenditures: Arms Races and Spill-Over Effects in Cross-Section and Panel Data," Discussion Papers 0801, British University in Egypt, Faulty of Business Administration, Economics and Political Science.
    4. Peter S. Heller, 2005. "Pity the Finance Minister; Issues in Managing a Substantial Scaling-Up of Aid Flows," IMF Working Papers 05/180, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, vinaya, 1998. "The implications of foreign aid fungibility for development assistance," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2022, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Elisa Cavatorta & Ron P. Smith, 2017. "Factor Models in Panels with Cross-sectional Dependence: An Application to the Extended SIPRI Military Expenditure Data," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 437-456, July.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkefp:1001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://www.ems.bbk.ac.uk/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.