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Trade with Asia and Skill Upgrading: Effects on Factor Markets in the Older Industrial Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Tyers, R.
  • Yang, Y.

Abstract

Economic growth and trade liberalization since the 1970s have led to rapid growth in exports from many developing countries. The link between this expansion and the tendancy for wage dispersion in the older industrial countries is explored in this paper using global general equilibrium analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Tyers, R. & Yang, Y., 1996. "Trade with Asia and Skill Upgrading: Effects on Factor Markets in the Older Industrial Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 346, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:346
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kazuki Tomioka & Rod Tyers, 2016. "Has Foreign Growth Contributed to Stagnation and Inequality in Japan?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 16-14, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    2. Liu, Jing & van Leeuwen, Nico & Vo, Tri Thanh & Tyers, Rodney & Hertel, Thomas W., 1998. "Disaggregating Labor Payments By Skill Level In Gtap," Technical Papers 28722, Purdue University, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Global Trade Analysis Project.
    3. Milenko Popovic, 2007. "Rising Wage Inequality, Rate Of Return On Investment In Education, And Cost Of Education," Montenegrin Journal of Economics, Economic Laboratory for Transition Research (ELIT), vol. 3(5), pages 35-58.
    4. Niven Winchester, 2008. "Searching for the Smoking Gun: Did Trade Hurt Unskilled Workers?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(265), pages 141-156, June.
    5. Rod Tyers & Yongzheng Yang, 2004. "The Asian Recession and Northern Labour Markets," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(248), pages 58-75, March.
    6. Greenaway, David & Nelson, Douglas, 2000. "The Assessment: Globalization and Labour-Market Adjustment," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 1-11, Autumn.
    7. Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller, 2000. "Australia's Unemployment Problem," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(232), pages 74-104, March.
    8. Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2020. "Financial integration and the global effects of China's growth surge," Discussion Papers 2020-27, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    9. Niven WINCHESTER & David GREENAWAY, 2010. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Rising Wage Inequality in the UK," EcoMod2004 330600159, EcoMod.
    10. Niven Winchester, 2006. "Trade and Rising Wage Inequality: What can we learn from a Decade of Computable General Equilibrium Analysis?," Working Papers 0606, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2006.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ASIA; TRADE; INTERNATIONAL TRADE; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; EXPORTS;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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