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Industry Premium: What we Know and What The New Zealand Data Say

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  • Bandyopadhyay, Debasis

Abstract

This paper critically reviews conventional explanations of why the individual income reflects an industry premium. It presents four facts about industry premiums in New Zealand to highlight the limitation of those explanations. In particular, it suggests that competitive theories that refer to unobservable characteristics or compensating wage differentials are too broad and non-competitive theories that rely on the efficiency wage hypothesis are too narrow to successfully explain what the New Zealand data reveal. Employees receive industry premium, but so do the self-employed, and do so more than the employees if uneducated; but the premium difference falls as the education level rises.

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  • Bandyopadhyay, Debasis, 1999. "Industry Premium: What we Know and What The New Zealand Data Say," Working Papers 151, Department of Economics, The University of Auckland.
  • Handle: RePEc:auc:wpaper:151
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    Cited by:

    1. Debasis Bandyopadhyay, 2004. "Why haven't economic reforms increased productivity growth in New Zealand?," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2), pages 219-240.

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