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Global sulfur emissions in the 1990s

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  • David I. Stern

    (Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University)

Abstract

This paper provides global and country by country estimates of sulfur emissions for the early and mid-1990s. Raw estimates are obtained in two ways. For countries with published data we compile that data from the available sources. For the remaining countries, we use either the decomposition model estimated by Stern (1999), the first differences environmental Kuznets curve model estimated by Stern and Common (2001), or simple extrapolation depending on the availability of data on the explanatory variables. We then examine the compatibility of these estimates with the ASL estimates for 1990. Based on these and other comparisons we construct a preferred database for 1850-1999 and discuss the main movements in the 1990s. The data is available from the datasite.

Suggested Citation

  • David I. Stern, 2001. "Global sulfur emissions in the 1990s," Working Papers in Ecological Economics 0103, Australian National University, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Ecological Economics Program.
  • Handle: RePEc:anu:wpieep:0103
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    File URL: http://een.anu.edu.au/download_files/eep0103.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Beckerman, Wilfred, 1992. "Economic growth and the environment: Whose growth? whose environment?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 481-496, April.
    2. Stern, David I. & Common, Michael S., 2001. "Is There an Environmental Kuznets Curve for Sulfur?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 162-178, March.
    3. David I. Stern, 2012. "Ecological Economics," Crawford School Research Papers 1203, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    4. Martinez-Alier, J., 1995. "The environment as a luxury good or "too poor to be green"?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-10, April.
    5. Stern, David I., 2002. "Explaining changes in global sulfur emissions: an econometric decomposition approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 201-220, August.
    6. Zhang, Zhongxiang, 2000. "Decoupling China's Carbon Emissions Increase from Economic Growth: An Economic Analysis and Policy Implications," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 739-752, April.
    7. Susmita Dasgupta & Benoit Laplante & Hua Wang & David Wheeler, 2002. "Confronting the Environmental Kuznets Curve," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 147-168, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. CANCELO, M. Teresa, 2010. "The relationship between CO2 and sulphur emissions with income: an alternative explanation to the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(1).
    2. DIAZ-VAZQUEZ, M. Rosario, 2009. "The Dissociation Between Emissions And Economic Growth: The Role Of Shocks Exogenous To The Environmental Kuznets Curve Model," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(2).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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