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Increasing Returns versus Externalities: Pro-Cyclical Productivity in US and Japan

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  • Michela VECCHI

    () ([n.a.])

Abstract

This paper investigates the phenomenon of pro-cyclical productivity and attempts to discriminate among several competing explanations given in the literature. The study focuses on the United States and Japan. The different industrial relations in these two economics cast a sharper light on the pro-cyclical productivity debate. Although the labour boarding hypothesis has proved to be quite robust, my results suggest that the role of external economies should not be underestimated, especially in the case of Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Michela VECCHI, 1996. "Increasing Returns versus Externalities: Pro-Cyclical Productivity in US and Japan," Working Papers 83, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  • Handle: RePEc:anc:wpaper:83
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    File URL: http://docs.dises.univpm.it/web/quaderni/pdf/083.pdf
    File Function: First version, 1996
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    Cited by:

    1. Julia Darby & Robert A Hart & Michaela Vecchi, 1998. "Labour Force Participation and the Business Cycle: A Comparative Analysis of Europe, Japan and the United States," Working Papers 9802, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    2. Ana Rincon & Michela VECCHI & Francesco VENTURINI, 2012. "ICT spillovers, absorptive capacity and productivity performance," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 103/2012, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    3. Francesco Venturini & Ana Rincon-Aznar & Dr Michela Vecchi, 2013. "ICT as a general purpose technology: spillovers, absorptive capacity and productivity performance," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 416, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

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