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Expenditures on Children by Families, 2007

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  • Lino, Mark

Abstract

Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 2007 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and methods used in calculating annual child-rearing expenses are described. Estimates are provided for major components of the budget by age of child, family income, and region of residence. For the overall United States, child-rearing expense estimates ranged between $10,930 and $12,030 for a child in a two-child, married-couple family in the middle-income group. Adjustment factors for number of children in the household are also provided. Results of this study should be of use in developing State child support guidelines and foster care payments as well as in family educational programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Lino, Mark, 2008. "Expenditures on Children by Families, 2007," CNPP Reports 45852, United States Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:usacnr:45852
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.45852
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/45852/files/crc2007.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. John Hadjimarcou, 2012. "AN INVESTIGATION OF INFORMATIONAL VERSUS EMOTIONAL ADVERTISING APPEALS DURING LIFE TRANSITIONS Abstract: The traditional family life cycle model explains the consumption behavior of individuals and ho," International Journal of Management and Marketing Research, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 5(1), pages 55-65.
    2. Chi, Wei & Qian, Xiaoye, 2016. "Human capital investment in children: An empirical study of household child education expenditure in China, 2007 and 2011," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 52-65.
    3. Anthony A. Noce & Dhimtri Qirjo & Namini De Silva, 2016. "Enticing the Stork: Can we Evaluate Pro-Natal Policies Before Having Children?," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 184-202, June.

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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Labor and Human Capital; Public Economics;

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