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"No-Till" Farming Is a Growing Practice

Author

Listed:
  • Horowitz, John K.
  • Ebel, Robert M.
  • Ueda, Kohei

Abstract

Most U.S. farmers prepare their soil for seeding and weed and pest control through tillage—plowing operations that disturb the soil. Tillage practices affect soil carbon, water pollution, and farmers’ energy and pesticide use, and therefore data on tillage can be valuable for understanding the practice’s role in reaching climate and other environmental goals. In order to help policymakers and other interested parties better understand U.S. tillage practices and, especially, those practices’ potential contribution to climate-change efforts, ERS researchers compiled data from the Agricultural Resource Management Survey and the National Resources Inventory-Conservation Effects Assessment Project’s Cropland Survey. The data show that approximately 35.5 percent of U.S. cropland planted to eight major crops, or 88 million acres, had no tillage operations in 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Horowitz, John K. & Ebel, Robert M. & Ueda, Kohei, 2010. ""No-Till" Farming Is a Growing Practice," Economic Information Bulletin 96636, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:96636
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.96636
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/96636/files/EIB70.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Pannell, David J. & Pardey, Philip G. & Hurley, Terrence M., 2020. "Private Incentives for Sustainable Agriculture: Principals and Evidence for Sustainable Agricultural Change," Working Papers 304700, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    2. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Nehring, Richard & Osteen, Craig & Wechsler, Seth James & Martin, Andrew & Vialou, Alex, 2014. "Pesticide Use in U.S. Agriculture: 21 Selected Crops, 1960-2008," Economic Information Bulletin 178462, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Pannell, David J., 2013. "Value for Money in Environmental Policy and Environmental Economics," Working Papers 146501, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    4. Bhattarai, Mukesh Dev & Secchi, Silvia & Schoof, Justin, 2017. "Projecting corn and soybeans yields under climate change in a Corn Belt watershed," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 90-99.
    5. Wade, Tara & Kurkalova, Lyubov A. & Secchi, Silvia, 2012. "Using the logit model with aggregated choice data in estimation of Iowa corn farmers’ conservation tillage subsidies," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124974, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Mitchell, Paul D., 2011. "Economic Assessment of the Benefits of Chloro-s-triazine Herbicides to U.S. Corn, Sorghum, and Sugarcane Producers," Staff Paper Series 564, University of Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    7. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Livingston, Michael J. & Mitchell, Lorraine & Wechsler, Seth, 2014. "Genetically Engineered Crops in the United States," Economic Research Report 164263, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Sands, Ron & Westcott, Paul & Price, J. Michael & Beckman, Jayson & Leibtag, Ephraim & Lucier, Gary & McBride, William D. & McGranahan, David & Morehart, Mitch & Roeger, Edward & Schaible, Glenn & Woj, 2011. "Impacts of Higher Energy Prices on Agriculture and Rural Economies," Economic Research Report 262236, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. MacDonald, James M., 2011. "Why Are Farms Getting Larger? The Case Of The U.S," 51st Annual Conference, Halle, Germany, September 28-30, 2011 115361, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    10. Mark Sperow, 2019. "Marginal cost to increase soil organic carbon using no-till on U.S. cropland," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 93-112, January.
    11. Claassen, Roger & Bowman, Maria & McFadden, Jonathan & Smith, David & Wallander, Steven, 2018. "Tillage Intensity and Conservation Cropping in the United States," Economic Information Bulletin 277566, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    12. Tran, Dat Q. & Kurkalova, Lyubov A., 2017. "Testing for complementarity between the use of continuous no-till and cover crops: an application of Entropy approach," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 259149, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Pannell, David J. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Corbeels, Marc, 2013. "The farm-level economics of conservation agriculture for resource-poor farmers," Working Papers 166526, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    14. Wallander, Steven & Aillery, Marcel & Hellerstein, Daniel & Hand, Michael S., 2013. "The Role of Conservation Programs in Drought Risk Adaptation," Economic Research Report 262224, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    15. MacDonald, James M. & Korb, Penni & Hoppe, Robert A., 2013. "Farm Size and the Organization of U.S. Crop Farming," Economic Research Report 262221, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    16. Hussain, Mir Zaman & Hamilton, Stephen K. & Bhardwaj, Ajay K. & Basso, Bruno & Thelen, Kurt D. & Robertson, G.P., 2019. "Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency of continuous maize and maize and soybean in rotation in the upper Midwest U.S," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 221(C), pages 92-98.
    17. Boyer, Christopher N. & Jensen, Kimberly L. & McLeod, Elizabeth & Larson, James A., 2016. "Upland Cotton Producers’ Willingness to participate in a BMP/STAX Pilot Program," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 234975, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. Beckman, Jayson F. & Borchers, Allison & Jones, Carol, 2013. "Agriculture's Supply and Demand for Energy and Energy Products," Economic Information Bulletin 149033, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    19. Wade, Tara & Claassen, Roger, 2015. "Modeling No-Tillage Adoption by Corn and Soybean Producers: Insights into Sustained Adoption," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 204957, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    20. Tamer El-Shater & Amin Mugera & Yigezu A. Yigezu, 2020. "Implications of Adoption of Zero Tillage (ZT) on Productive Efficiency and Production Risk of Wheat Production," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-13, May.
    21. Wade, Tara & Kurkalova, Lyubov & Secchi, Silvia, 2016. "Modeling Field-Level Conservation Tillage Adoption with Aggregate Choice Data," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 41(2), May.
    22. Livingston, Michael & Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Unger, Jesse & Osteen, Craig & Schimmelpfennig, David & Park, Tim & Lambert, Dayton, 2015. "The Economics of Glyphosate Resistance Management in Corn and Soybean Production," Economic Research Report 205083, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    23. Jayson L. Lusk, 2017. "Evaluating the Policy Proposals of the Food Movement," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 39(3), pages 387-406.
    24. Schimmelpfennig, David & Ebel, Robert, 2016. "Sequential Adoption and Cost Savings from Precision Agriculture," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 41(1), pages 1-19, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy; Farm Management; Land Economics/Use; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; Risk and Uncertainty;

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