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The Transformation of U.S. Livestock Agriculture: Scale, Efficiency, and Risks

Author

Listed:
  • MacDonald, James M.
  • McBride, William D.

Abstract

U.S. livestock production has shifted to much larger and more specialized farms, and the various stages of input provision, farm production, and processing are now much more tightly coordinated through formal contracts and shared ownership of assets. Important financial advantages have driven these structural changes, which in turn have boosted productivity growth in the livestock sector. But structural changes can also generate environmental and health risks for society, as industrialization concentrates animals and animal wastes in localized areas. This report relies on farm-level data to detail the nature, causes, and effects of structural changes in livestock production.

Suggested Citation

  • MacDonald, James M. & McBride, William D., 2009. "The Transformation of U.S. Livestock Agriculture: Scale, Efficiency, and Risks," Economic Information Bulletin 58311, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:58311
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58311
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2002. "Household Food Security In The United States, 2001," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33865, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gloy, Brent A., 2010. "Carbon Dioxide Offsets from Anaerobic Digestion of Dairy Waste," Working Papers 126750, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    2. MacDonald, James M., 2011. "Why Are Farms Getting Larger? The Case Of The U.S," 51st Annual Conference, Halle, Germany, September 28-30, 2011 115361, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    3. Malcolm, Scott A. & Aillery, Marcel P. & Weinberg, Marca, 2009. "Ethanol and a Changing Agricultural Landscape," Economic Research Report 55671, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Stutzman, Sarah A., 2016. "U.S. Farm Capital Investment 1996-2013: Differences by Farm Size and Operator Primary Occupation," Dissertations-Doctoral 235179, AgEcon Search.
    5. Rachael Goodhue & Leo Simon, 2016. "Agricultural contracts, adverse selection, and multiple inputs," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-33, December.
    6. James M. MacDonald, 2014. "Comment on "Influences of Agricultural Technology on the Size and Importance of Food Price Variability"," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Food Price Volatility, pages 54-58 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Cai, Xiaowei & Stiegert, Kyle W. & Koontz, Stephen R., 2009. "Oligopsony Power: Evidence from the U.S. Beef Packing Industry," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49364, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Brian C. Briggeman & Jason Henderson, 2009. "The slow road back for the U.S. livestock industry," Main Street Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue 4.
    9. Dimitrios Panagiotou & Athanassios Stavrakoudis, 2017. "A Stochastic Production Frontier Estimator of the Degree of Oligopsony Power in the U.S. Cattle Industry," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 121-133, March.
    10. Roeger, Edward & Leibtag, Ephraim S., 2011. "How Retail Beef and Bread Prices Respond to Changes in Ingredient and Input and Costs," Economic Research Report 102757, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    11. McCann, Laura, 2013. "Transaction costs and environmental policy design," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 253-262.
    12. MacDonald, James M. & Korb, Penelope J., 2011. "Agricultural Contracting Update: Contracts in 2008," Economic Information Bulletin 101279, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    13. Roeger, Edward & Leibtag, Ephraim S., 2010. "The Magnitude and Timing of Retail Beef and Bread Price Response to Changes in Input Costs," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61041, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Nehring, Richard & Katchova, Ani L. & Gillespie, Jeffrey & Hallahan, Charlie & Harris, Michael & Erickson, Ken, 2014. "A Frontier Analysis of U.S. Poultry Farms: Developing Performance Measures," 2014 Annual Meeting, February 1-4, 2014, Dallas, Texas 162434, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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