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Does The Current Sugar Market Structure Benefit Consumers And Sugarcane Growers?

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  • Chisanga, Brian
  • Meyer, Ferdinand H.
  • Winter-Nelson, Alex
  • Sitko, Nicholas J.

Abstract

The market structure in Zambia’s sugar industry is highly concentrated, leading to consumers paying higher prices than expected given the low cost of sugar production in the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Chisanga, Brian & Meyer, Ferdinand H. & Winter-Nelson, Alex & Sitko, Nicholas J., 2014. "Does The Current Sugar Market Structure Benefit Consumers And Sugarcane Growers?," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 196830, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midips:196830
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.196830
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/196830/files/ps_69.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Abdulai, Awudu, 2013. "Effects of Policy Reforms on Price Transmission in Coffee Markets: Evidence from Zambia and Tanzania," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171870, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Jochen Meyer & Stephan von Cramon‐Taubadel, 2004. "Asymmetric Price Transmission: A Survey," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 581-611, November.
    3. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
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    Cited by:

    1. Faaiqa Hartley & Dirk van Seventer & Paul Chimuka Samboko & Channing Arndt, 2019. "Economy-wide implications of biofuel production in Zambia," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 213-232, March.
    2. Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Harris, Jody & Mkandawire, Elizabeth & Nthani, Dorothy & Hendriks, Sheryl L., 2016. "Drivers of Micronutrient Policy Change in Zambia: An Application of the Kaleidoscope Model," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245110, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Manda, S. & Tallontire, A. & Dougill, A.J., 2020. "Outgrower schemes and sugar value-chains in Zambia: Rethinking determinants of rural inclusion and exclusion," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    4. Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Harris, Jody & Mkwandawire, Elizabeth & Nthani, Dorothy & Hendriks, Sheryl L., 2016. "Drivers Of Micronutrient Policy Change In Zambia: An Application Of The Kaleidoscope Model," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 259047, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    5. Resnick, Danielle & Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Hendriks, Sheryl L. & Mather, David, 2018. "The Kaleidoscope Model of policy change: Applications to food security policy in Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 101-120.
    6. Paul C. Samboko & Mitelo Subakanya & Cliff Dlamini, 2017. "Potential biofuel feedstocks and production in Zambia," WIDER Working Paper Series 047, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Haggblade, Steven & Babu , Suresh, 2017. "A User’S Guide To The Kaleidoscope Model: Practical Tools For Understanding Policy Change," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 264396, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Security and Poverty;

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