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How are Vegetables Marketed into Lusaka? The Structure of Lusaka’s Fresh Produce Marketing System and Implications for Investment Priorities

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  • Hichaambwa, Munguzwe
  • Tschirley, David L.

Abstract

Key findings regarding the structure of trade for tomato, rape, and onion into Lusaka are (a) regional trade is an important part of Zambia’s fresh produce system, (b) supply chains for tomato, rape, and onion are short, (c) the role of the modern market system is very small, and (d) the role of urban agriculture in supplying Lusaka markets for these vegetables is also small, though it is meaningful in the case of rape. Main policy implications from this and related work are that (a) investments and policies to promote regional trade are relevant for the horticultural sector, not just food staples, (b) the traditional market system needs improved hard infrastructure linked to more collaborative public/private management models and improved coordination in the supply chains, and (c) more programmatic emphasis should be placed on helping existing traders scale-up and gain better access to information to do their job more effectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Tschirley, David L., 2010. "How are Vegetables Marketed into Lusaka? The Structure of Lusaka’s Fresh Produce Marketing System and Implications for Investment Priorities," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 93008, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcpb:93008
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.93008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. W. Bruce Traill, 2006. "The Rapid Rise of Supermarkets?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(2), pages 163-174, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2012. "Urban Consumption Patterns of Livestock Products in Zambia and Implications for Policy," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 132343, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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    Keywords

    Community/Rural/Urban Development; Food Security and Poverty; Marketing;
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