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Diet quality and income in Rural and Urban China: evidence from the Health and Nutrition Survey


  • Capacci, Sara
  • Mazzocchi, Mario
  • Liu, Y.


The specific objective of this paper is the investigation of the link between an improvement in Chinese households’ wealth and the quality of their diet and the role played by this relationship on the overall nutrition transition process. Better economic conditions mean a worsening of the diet in terms of higher energy intakes from fats, only partially compensated by higher fruit and vegetable intakes. China nutrition transition is going on and the rapid economic growth may lead to adverse health consequences if the negative effects of this transition will not be contrasted.

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  • Capacci, Sara & Mazzocchi, Mario & Liu, Y., 2008. "Diet quality and income in Rural and Urban China: evidence from the Health and Nutrition Survey," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43638, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:43638

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David A. Hennessy, 1998. "The Production Effects of Agricultural Income Support Policies under Uncertainty," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(1), pages 46-57.
    2. Teresa Serra & Barry K. Goodwin & Allen M. Featherstone, 2005. "Agricultural Policy Reform and Off-farm Labour Decisions," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 271-285.
    3. Hung-Jen Wang, 2002. "Heteroscedasticity and Non-Monotonic Efficiency Effects of a Stochastic Frontier Model," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 241-253, November.
    4. Battese, G E & Coelli, T J, 1995. "A Model for Technical Inefficiency Effects in a Stochastic Frontier Production Function for Panel Data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 325-332.
    5. Giannis Karagiannis & Vangelis Tzouvelekas, 2007. "A flexible time-varying specification of the technical inefficiency effects model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 531-540, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jing You, 2014. "Dietary change, nutrient transition and food security in fast-growing China," Chapters,in: Handbook on Food, chapter 9, pages 204-245 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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    Nutrition; diet quality; China; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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